Sales

New Key Chain Design

I have released a new style of key chain on to my Etsy shop. These are made with leather strips that have been securely glued into an end cap. I have tied on beads and charms for 3 new looks. I have one with an anchor charm, one with a tree, and one that has a bird charm and a binocular charm. You can find all three on my shop here. The also each have a different color of leather to give them a unique look.

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Patterns, Sales

Middleton Pullover

I have finally launched this sweater. πŸ˜€ It has been a year in the making! After some issues with gauge and then the process of getting sleeves that looked good, it has been quite the process.

This sweater has a lace design on the bottom of the body, as well as the bottom of the sleeves. I wanted to give an airy feel to the sweater, while still leaving the warmth of the upper body in tact. It is knit from the bottom up and will give the opportunity to add extra length as you go, if you find you need it. I know, personally, I do like to lengthen all of my sweaters. The sleeves are knit by picking up stitches in the armhole and knitting down to the cuff. This made for an easier finish, since the sleeves did not need to be sewn in.

The sweater calls for sport weight yarn. I used Miss Babs Killington, in the Dahlia colorway. You will need between 1400 and 2100 yards for this sweater, depending on your size and gauge. You will need US 4 (3.5mm) needles for the bulk of the knitting, and US 3 (3.25mm) for the cuffs of the body and sleeves.

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Blog, Patterns, Sales

New Products!

Today I launched another key chain. This one is a Mini Rosary and is available in two colors: Pink and Blue. I have to say that after a lot of trouble getting beads I like, I fell in love with the blue. The blue beads I ordered never arrived, so I had to find something else. These were sitting upstairs just waiting to become these key chains. πŸ˜€

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Also! On the design front, the test for the Scarf of Many Colors is wrapping up and that pattern will be launched in the next couple days. So, keep your eyes peeled for that one. πŸ˜€

I also have a new sock design that is in progress. I’m hoping to get this finished soon because I have a couple pairs of socks to make for a donation, and those will take priority when the yarn arrives for them. But, either way, these socks will be heading off for testing in the next month or so. I am really liking how they are turning out. πŸ˜€ Right now I am going back and forth on the heel color. I think I might do green for the heel, since the toes are grey. I think that will make a nice statement.

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And speaking of socks, I am hoping to get the third installment on How to Knit Socks up in the next few days.

How To

Sock Basics Part 2: Heel and Gusset

Now that the leg of our sock is completed, it’s time to consider the construction of the Heel and the Gusset. The Heel part of your pattern will usually form the strip that goes down the last part of your leg to the ground, and then will magically turn into a little triangle for the back of your heel to sit in to. The Gusset will then come off that flap and triangle to create the part that goes along your ankle bone. Both are very important, and may take some trial and error to find the heel and size that works for you. The Gusset also provides the space for your instep, so that the top of your foot has the room it needs, and will also help with the sock being able to slip up over your ankle.

The Heel: Every pattern will give you instructions for the heel. Depending on the type of construction they are using, you will typically get a section for a Heel Flap and a section for Heel. The Heel Flap is that strip going down the back of the leg I was talking about. This is normally knit back and forth over a certain amount of stitches, while the other stitches just sit around doing nothing for a while. So, you will have knits and purls going on here, and you will have both a right side and a wrong side. The right side will be the part of the fabric that will go on the outside. The wrong side will be the part that touches your foot on the inside of the fabric. Many patterns use a variation on knitting, purling and slipping stitches to create a thicker and more durable fabric. But, there are many different ways of doing this. If you are working on a very detailed pattern, you might find that the pattern runs down the heel flap as well. It may help for you to take a measurement to see just how long you want that heel flap. I tend to measure from the top of my ankle bone to the floor, and since my feet are two different sizes, I make sure to measure both. They are both actually 3″. However, the socks do have some stretch, so I typically will take off about 20%. That ends up being 2.4″. Since the patterns tend to suggest 2.5″, I will go with that number. If you have a high instep, you might want to consider making your heel a bit longer. The biggest reason is to allow the sock to not only go over your ankle, but to give you room to have your foot feel comfortable.

As you knit socks, you will start to learn what feels most comfortable for you. This can be a bit of trial and error, because there are different heel constructions. The heel flap and heel tend to be short rows. That means you will be knitting part of the row, and then turning your work and leaving some of the stitches of the heel unworked. However, there are other options. I found a great page with information on all the various heels that are available here. As you will see there are many. You can knit the heel as you work the sock, or you can do an afterthought heel, which means you put in a piece of spare yarn and keep knitting a tube. Then later you come back and pick up the stitches on that spare yarn and make your heel. You can also consider doing the heels and toes a different color, for a contrast heel. There are so many ways to spruce up those heels!

Gusset: When you work the gusset (and I’m going to continue on the assumption that we are going to work a basic short row heel), you will be picking up stitches along the heel flap. You are going to end up with a lot of stitches on your needles at first. In general, you will be picking up about 16 stitches on each side of that heel flap (the exact number will always appear in your pattern). This will make things fiddly and bulky for a bit. If you are knitting on circular needles, then you’ll just have a lot of stitches to work with, and you’ll find your way through. This is how I normally will work. If you are using double pointed needles, then you’ll have just a couple needles stuffed full, but you’ll also just have to work your way through. Make sure that you follow the pattern very closely when arranging your stitches. There is a particular line up of stitches, because you will still have one set that is for the top of your foot (instep), and you will be decreasing stitches in your gusset on either side of that just before and just after those instep stitches. You don’t want to decrease within the instep itself. These decreases all happen on what will become the bottom of your foot (sole). The gusset decreases in the sock will create a little triangle along both sides of your ankle.

The great thing is that once you have completed those gusset decreases, you are in the home stretch! You are now onto the foot! I think one of my first recommendations is to follow the pattern exactly as written for that first sock. The heel is going to seem very strange at first, but I promise that if you follow it exactly it magically turns into a heel. One my first sock I was really nervous. The instructions seemed so strange! And then suddenly…poof heel! It was pretty cool, actually. I felt very accomplished. πŸ˜€ Also, be prepared to not have a well fitting sock at first. All patterns are written for what I will call the average foot, and goes off the sizings written by places like shoe companies and manufacturers. The best place to start for any knitwear sizing is the Craft Yarn Council. They have a great chart here. But, again, these are average sizes.

If you are making socks for someone with a high instep you have a couple options. When you work the heel flap, consider increasing it by a half inch to an inch. For example, if you measure your heel at about 4″ (mine was at 3″), then you subtract 20% from that, you will get 3.2″. I would knit the heel to 3″ instead of the patterns typical 2.5″. This will mean that you will also be picking up more stitches than the pattern suggests. You will pick up every single stitch along the side. So, if you worked 20 right side rows and 20 wrong side rows, you will be picking up 20 stitches on each side of the heel flap. This will also mean that you will do more Gusset decreases. However, this is where you can adjust for a higher arch, as well. If you have a taller foot at the arch, then do not decrease as much as the pattern suggests. Stop with about 4 more stitches remaining than they recommend. And easy way to calculate what you will need in terms of numbers of stitches, is to take the number you are given in the pattern for stitch gauge. It should be written as a number per four inches. Divide that number by 4, and that will give you the number of stitches per inch. If you feel like you need an extra inch, then leave about that many stitches not decreased. If you do not get a whole number, round up or down to the nearest inch. I’ll explain how to deal with that change in number for the toes in the next installment. πŸ˜€

I know this is a lot of information, but this really is the most complicated and adjustable part of the entire sock. Once you get this part figured out, you will be well ahead of the game! Be sure to check out the link above for heel construction options. But, as with anything, there is no number one thing that works for everyone. A lot of people adore the Fish Lips Kiss Heel, but a lot of people also find it doesn’t fit them well. Also, many of these heel variations are their own pattern, and are available for sale by the designers. They will also provide their own instructions on how to blend it into any sock, and how to properly take measurements to create the best fit possible.

I hope you are enjoying working on your new socks! The best thing is that hand knit socks can be worn all year round. If you find the legs too warm, then shorten that cuff down to only 1-2″ before you start the heel flap, and you have a wonderful ankle sock. If you want them to be more airy, then find a nice lace pattern for the leg and top of the foot, and you’ll get a wonderful breeze through those socks.

Hopefully I have given you enough information to work through that first heel. πŸ˜€ Stay tuned for the next edition, which will be all about those toes!

Thanks for reading!!

Blog

Cactus Keychain

I have just listed my next keychain. This is my Cactus Keychain. It is a Kumihimo braid that is finished with a few beads and a cactus charm. I have used industrial strength glue on any knots and on the end cap to make it as strong as possible. There are only 4 of these little guys, for now, until I can get more charms.

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The finished length, including the keychain hardware is 7.25″. I hope you love it!

Blog

More Keychains

I launched another set of keychains yesterday. These ones are my critters line. I have a cat, a shark, a killer whale and a panda. πŸ˜€ I’m hoping next week to get some other ones made up. These next ones will be a beaded/Chinese knot style. I am waiting for some supplies to arrive, and then I can start the R&D on those ones. I am thinking of perhaps a Kumihimo version as well. I’m just not sure of the design yet. I have something in mind, but I have to work up the prototype to see if the vision in my mind can be recreated in real life. πŸ˜€

But, for now, here are the critters. I really need to figure out a better way to photograph them. I think instead of hanging them, I will skewer them on the nail I have in the wall for these and get them to sit properly. I’m going to work on that this weekend, and then I can update my listings with the best version.

This little guy is my absolute favorite so far. It’s my killer whale. I gave him just a single fin on top to make him more stream lined, but I think he’s just adorable. πŸ˜€

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This is my cat critter keychain. πŸ˜€ I had a lot of fun figuring out his face. hehe

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This is my happy little shark. His gills make it look like he has hair. hehe But, he’s super cute. πŸ˜€ He has the single fin on top, just like the killer whale.

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Then we have the panda. He is mostly white, with a stripe of black around his middle, and then back to a white bum.

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All these little critters are a lot of fun to make. Although, I will admit that even though the killer whale is my favorite, working with the black yarn is not my favorite. lol It’s so hard to see! But, he’s so cute that I’ll overlook it just for him. πŸ˜‰

Blog

Keychains!

I have finally made enough progress to list my keychains/bag tags for sale. These little guys are hugs. They are designed to give you something to send to a friend or loved one to let them know you are thinking of them, or to even get for yourself to remember you are loved! I tried to chose a range of colors for different tastes, while keeping them mostly bright to be uplifting. They are between 2 and 2.5″ in width. The width will vary based on when I have made them, and the yarn I used. I use all the same brand yarn, but it still has variation in thickness. That is the joy of handmade! They are all 100% unique.

These are each made with acrylic yarn for durability, and have polyester fill. They are meant to be soft and squishy. I have used safety eyes for each of them, but they are still not meant to be toys and are not safe for children. Each one comes with the key chain hardware already attached, so they are ready to go!

I haven’t quite figured out the shipping logistics for these on the website yet, so I have chosen to list them on Etsy for now. I may change things up later, but for now this is a great solution.

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Blog, Patterns, Test Knits

Open Test Knits!

I have two patterns that are accepting test knitters. First up is my Scarf of Many Colors. I have a group started on Ravelry, but you can also work with me via email. This scarf uses fingering weight yarn, in a variety of colors that are completely up to your choosing. I’m not picky. I personally used Miss Babs Advent 2018 kit in the Midcentury colorway. I used all 25 colors, but did repeat a couple. You’ll want to be able to make 29 triangles, if you want to match the sample. Of course, you can always adjust the size up or down, but I recommend an odd number of colors to get a squared end scarf.

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This scarf is a pretty easy knit. The main stitches are simple knit and purl stitches. The only complication to it, are the wraps. I have included detailed instructions on how to work the wraps, but you can also search for ‘knitting wraps’ or ‘purling wraps’ and you will get some great videos on how to do these. This is done to create short rows and make the triangle shape.

The deadline for the scarf completion is September 20, 2019. And for testing for me, you will get the finalized pattern for the scarf as well as a coupon code for a free pattern of your choosing (not including kits or ebooks) that is valid for one full year.

The second test knit that is open is for my Middleton Pullover. There is also a group on Ravelry for this, but just like the scarf, we can work together via email if you prefer. This sweater uses sport weight yarn. I chose Miss Babs Killington in the Dahlia colorway. One of the requirements for this test is letting me know how much yarn you used to complete your size. The sizes available are 30 (32, 36, 40, 44, 48, 52)β€œ Bust. I have built in 2″ of ease, so the finished measurements will be 32 (34, 38, 42, 46, 50, 54)” Bust.

This pullover has lace at the bottom of the body as well as at the bottom of the sleeves. The construction is bottom up for the body. Then for the sleeves, the stitches are picked up and the sleeves are then knit down to the cuff.

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The deadline for the sweater completion is October 15, 2019, which means it should be finished in time for the cooler temperatures. For testing, you will get a copy of this finalized pattern, as well as a coupon code for one free pattern of your choosing (not including kits or ebooks) that will be valid for one full year.

If you are interested in testing either of these patterns, you can message me on Ravelry, or you can email me at tlcraftsanddesign at gmail dot com.

Patterns

New Release! Harvey Wallbanger Scarf

This scarf was inspired by a cake that my family makes. It’s called a Harvey Wallbanger cake. It’s an orange cake with a creamy icing that’s nicely boozed up. :slightly_smiling_face: I designed the scarf to have the nice orange color in the middle, just like the cake with the browned up exterior and the icing sitting on the outside.

The great thing with this scarf is you get this honeycomb effect that makes the scarf come alive, but it doesn’t take very long to memorize the pattern. It makes for great TV knitting, or perhaps when travelling. But, it will start to get long and cumbersome. hehe The texture also makes the scarf feel more full and fluffy, and will give it a nice warmth in the winter.